Mystery Monday Revealed

Mystery Monday revealed! The answer is:⁠

Sperm Whale⁠

📷⁠ by Sally W. ⁠

📷⁠ by Sally W. ⁠

📷⁠ by Mike W. ⁠

📷⁠ by Mike W. ⁠

Paul Jones shared this sighting report from our last 2020 tour. Check out the recorded underwater vocalizations in the video below!

“On March 18 aboard Searcher we found a group of about 20 sperm whales just east Isla Espiritu Santo in the Gulf of California. We had 20 animals that surfaced very near Searcher in 5-7 smaller groups. One whale swam straight toward Searcher affording a great view of its asymmetric blowhole before it fluked up and dove. Others bobbed at the surface for long periods as they recharged their muscles with oxygen, providing excellent opportunities for passengers to take photos of these impressive, deep-diving whales.”

https://youtu.be/2nReXeB39Zc

2020-07-15T16:34:04-07:00June 19th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday

Happy Mystery Monday!⁠

Can you guess this animal? We decided to make it a bit harder this week. This photo was taken on one of our trips in Baja. We’ll reveal the answer on Friday, so stay tuned for the answer and more from the field!⁠

📷 by Team Searcher⁠

2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00June 15th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday revealed

Mystery Monday revealed! The answer is:

Humpback 🐋

📷 by Mark W.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday’s Mystery photo showed just a glimpse of a humpback whale. But there’s so much more to see of these magnificent whales. Humpbacks are known to be very active and even acrobatic at the surface, which can catch the eye of whalewatchers even at a distance of miles.

Lunging, jumping, slapping or thrashing their flukes, or as in this reveal photo, breaching, all cause large disturbances at the surface. Humpback whales are very social, so acrobatics are likely related to interactions such as male to male competition, mothers protecting calves, aunties protecting mothers, and juveniles…well…playing!
We spend a lot of time with humpbacks when we can on our tours in Baja California because there is so much to observe and photograph. Our calm presence doesn’t seem to change them and we are often afforded wonderful looks.

Passengers on a trip got to listen to the lovely songs of the humpback whales. These humpbacks were singing for quite sometime and naturalist Marc Webber was able to record their songs and sounds on this recording off the Gorda Banks.

https://youtu.be/AB4BXyahM18

2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00June 12th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday

Happy Mystery Monday!⁠

Can you guess this animal? We decided to make it a bit harder this week. This photo was taken on one of our trips in Baja. We’ll reveal the answer on Friday, so stay tuned for the answer and more from the field!⁠

📷 by Team Searcher

2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00June 8th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday revealed!

Mystery Monday revealed! The answer is: Sea Turtle
That Monday mystery creature is, as far as I can tell, a green sea turtle. The animal in the Friday reveal is a loggerhead sea turtle. On Searcher trips in Baja we see both of these species regularly and can also spot Pacific Ridley’s and hawksbill turtles, though rarely. Leatherbacks are also possible, but I have only seen them up north. In any case, it’s difficult to identify them at sea and we rely on an ID key created by Seaturtle.org  (http://www.seaturtle.org/documents/ID_sheet.pdf) and good photographs. We look for the number of prefrontal scales as well as the nuchal and costal scute patterns. Green sea turtles lay eggs in Baja’s lagoons as well as in the upper part of the Gulf of California. Loggerheads are fascinating in that they forage in our waters but don’t nest locally. Instead, they migrate all the way back across the Pacific Ocean where the females lay their eggs primarily in eastern Australia and Japan. Paul Jones
2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00June 5th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday

Happy Mystery Monday!⁠

Can you guess this animal? We decided to make it a bit harder this week. This photo was taken on one of our trips in Baja. We’ll reveal the answer on Friday, so stay tuned for the answer and more from the field!⁠

📷 by Linda Lewis

 

2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00June 1st, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday revealed!

Mystery Monday revealed! The answer is: Long-beaked Common Dolphins
 
Thanks to this gorgeous slow-motion footage from Paul Jones, Searcher naturalist, we can see why common dolphins are such a treat to witness while aboard Searcher in Baja.
 
Common dolphins are strikingly marked and are often found traveling together in large groups or pods, sometimes up in the thousands. They are a joy to encounter as they often leap, splash back on their sides, and, as seen in this video, “bow ride” in the pressure wave made as the boat moves forward.
 
This footage captures the precision, athleticism, and agility of these dolphins as they quickly swim, surface, feed, and even socialize all while maneuvering in the bow of the boat. We often see very young calves swimming alongside mothers, both keeping up the pace!
 
Also in this video you can see remoras attached to some of the dolphins. These are suckerfishes that attach themselves via a flat sucking disk on their heads to larger marine animals such as whales, sharks and other fishes.
2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00May 29th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday

Happy Mystery Monday!⁠

Can you guess this animal? We decided to make it a bit harder this week. This photo was taken on one of our trips in Baja. We’ll reveal the answer on Friday, so stay tuned for the answer and more from the field!⁠

📷by Team Searcher⁠

2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00May 25th, 2020|News|

Mystery Monday revealed!

Mystery Monday revealed! The answer is:⁠⁠ Blue Whale

📸 by Chris E.

This is a blue whale surface lunge feeding with one of the tail flukes sticking out of the water as it’s on its side. Blue whales are the most massive animals to ever live on the planet. They are obligate krill eaters, and consume many tons of plankton every day. A calf gains 6 pounds per hour while nursing and the whale in this photo was with her calf when Searcher happened upon a feeding frenzy. In addition to this pair, we saw lots of birds, dolphins, and a Bryde’s whale. It was spectacular. –Paul Jones

2020-07-15T16:34:05-07:00May 22nd, 2020|News|